Tag Archives: 4th amendment

“Congress Exploits Our Fears to Take Our Liberty”, Ron Paul

via http://www.informationclearinghouse.info

Congress Exploits Our Fears to Take Our Liberty
By Ron Paul

April 22, 2013 “This week, as Americans were horrified by the attacks in Boston, both houses of Congress considered legislation undermining our liberty in the name of “safety.” Gun control continued to be the focus of the Senate, where an amendment expanding federal “background checks” to gun show sales and other private transfers dominated the debate. While the background check amendment failed to pass, proponents of gun control have made it clear they will continue their efforts to enact new restrictions on gun ownership into law.

While it did not receive nearly as much attention as the debate on gun control, the House of Representatives passed legislation with significant implications for individual liberty: the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA). CISPA proponents claim that the legislation is necessary to protect Americans from foreign “cyber terrorists,” but the real effect of this bill will be to further erode Americans’ online privacy.

Under CISPA, Internet corporations are authorized to hand over the private information of American citizens to federal agents, as long as they can justify the violation of your privacy in the name of protecting “cyber security”. Among the items that may be shared are your e-mails, browsing history, and online transactions.

Like the PATRIOT Act, CISPA violates the fourth amendment by allowing federal agencies to obtain private information without first seeking a warrant from a federal judge. The law also allows federal agencies to pass your information along to other federal bureaucrats — again without obtaining a warrant. And the bill provides private companies with immunity from lawsuits regardless of the damage done to anyone whose personal information is shared with the government.

CISPA represents a troubling form of corporatism, where large companies cede their responsibility to protect their property to the federal government, at the expense of their customers’ privacy and liberty. In this respect, CISPA can be thought of as an electronic version of the Transportation Security Administration, which has usurped the authority over airline security from private airlines. However, CISPA will prove to be far more invasive than even the most robust TSA screening.

CISPA and the gun control bill are only the most recent examples of politicians manipulating fear to con the people into giving up their liberties. Of course, the people are told the legislation is for “limited purposes,” but authority granted to government is rarely, if ever, used solely for the purpose for which it is granted. For example, the American people were promised that the extraordinary powers granted the government by the PATRIOT Act would only be used against terrorism. Yet soon after the bill became law, reports surfaced that it was being used for non-terrorism purposes. In fact, according to data compiled by the American Civil Liberties Union, 76 percent of the uses of the controversial “sneak-and-peak” warrants where related to the war on drugs!

Sadly, I expect this week’s tragic attacks in Boston to be used to justify new restrictions on liberty. Within 48 hours of the attack in Boston, at least one Congressman was calling for increased use of surveillance cameras to expand the government’s ability to monitor our actions, while another Senator called for a federal law mandating background checks before Americans can buy “explosive powder.”

I would not be surprised if the Transportation Security Administration uses this tragedy to claim new authority to “screen” Americans before they can attend sporting or other public events. The Boston attack may also be used as another justification for creating a National ID Card tied to a federal database with “biometric” information. The only thing that will stop them is if the American people rediscover the wisdom of Benjamin Franklin that you cannot achieve security by allowing government to take their liberties.

2 Comments

Filed under Man

DHS, detecting every tiny trace of ANY substance on your body, instantly!

via http://lawenforcementtoday.com,

New York City’s Commissioner of Police, Ray Kelley, announced that his department is developing a terahertz scanner that will reveal firearms through clothing…  The technology is similar to infrared cameras. The major difference is the super high frequency of terahertz radiation; its wavelength is in the millimeter range. Kelly proposes mounting these sensors on patrol cars to detect illegal weapons on passersby.  The commissioner reported in his annual State of the NYPD Address that 88% of all persons detained for a stop-and-frisk in the first 9 months of 2011 were determined to be completely innocent.

via http://gizmodo.com, (Jul 10, 2012) picosecond terahertz laser scanners

Within the next year or two, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security will instantly know everything about your body, clothes, and luggage with a new laser-based molecular scanner fired from 164 feet (50 meters) away. From traces of drugs or gun powder on your clothes to what you had for breakfast to the adrenaline level in your body—agents will be able to get any information they want without even touching you.

And without you knowing it.

The technology is so incredibly effective that, in November 2011, its inventors were subcontracted by In-Q-Tel to work with the US Department of Homeland Security. In-Q-Tel is a company founded “in February 1999 by a group of private citizens at the request of the Director of the CIA and with the support of the U.S. Congress.” According to In-Q-Tel, they are the bridge between the Agency and new technology companies.

Their plan is to install this molecular-level scanning in airports and border crossings all across the United States. The official, stated goal of this arrangement is to be able to quickly identify explosives, dangerous chemicals, or bioweapons at a distance.

The machine is ten million times faster—and one million times more sensitive—than any currently available system. That means that it can be used systematically on everyone passing through airport security, not just suspect or randomly sampled people.

Analyzing everything in real time

But the machine can sniff out a lot more than just explosives, chemicals and bioweapons. The company that invented it, Genia Photonics, says that its laser scanner technology is able to “penetrate clothing and many other organic materials and offers spectroscopic information, especially for materials that impact safety such as explosives and pharmacological substances.” [PDF]

Formed in Montreal in 2009 by PhDs with specialties in lasers and fiber optics, Genia Photonics has 30 patents on this technology, claiming incredible biomedical and industrial applications—from identifying individual cancer cells in a real-time scan of a patient, to detecting trace amounts of harmful chemicals in sensitive manufacturing processes.

Hidden Government Scanners Will Instantly Know Everything About You From 164 Feet Away

Above: The Genia Photonics’ Picosecond Programmable Laser scanner is capable of detecting every tiny trace of any substance on your body, from specks of gunpowder to your adrenaline levels to a sugar-sized grain of cannabis to what you had for breakfast.

Meanwhile, In-Q-Tel states that “an important benefit of Genia Photonics’ implementation as compared to existing solutions is that the entire synchronized laser system is comprised in a single, robust and alignment-free unit that may be easily transported for use in many environments… This compact and robust laser has the ability to rapidly sweep wavelengths in any pattern and sequence.” [PDF]

So not only can they scan everyone. They would be able to do it everywhere: the subway, a traffic light, sports events… everywhere.

How does it work?

The machine is a mobile, rack-mountable system. It fires a laser to provide molecular-level feedback at distances of up to 50 meters in just picoseconds. For all intents and purposes, that means instantly.

The small, inconspicuous machine is attached to a computer running a program that will show the information in real time, from trace amounts of cocaine on your dollar bills to gunpowder residue on your shoes. Forget trying to sneak a bottle of water past security—they will be able to tell what you had for breakfast in an instant while you’re walking down the hallway.

The technology is not new, it’s just millions times faster and more convenient than ever before. Back in 2008, a team at George Washington University developed a similar laser spectrometer using a different process. It could sense drug metabolites in urine in less than a second, trace amounts of explosive residue on a dollar bill, and even certain chemical changes happening in a plant leaf.

And the Russians also have a similar technology: announced last April, their “laser sensor can pick up on a single molecule in a million from up to 50 meters away.”

So if Genia Photonics’ claims pan out, this will be an incredible leap forward in terms of speed, portability, and convenience. One with staggering implications.

Observation without limits

There has so far been no discussion about the personal rights and privacy issues involved. Which “molecular tags” will they be scanning for? Who determines them? What are the threshold levels of this scanning? If you unknowingly stepped on the butt of someone’s joint and are carrying a sugar-sized grain of cannabis like that unfortunate traveler currently in jail in Dubai, will you be arrested?

And, since it’s extremely portable, will this technology extend beyone the airport or border crossings and into police cars, with officers looking for people on the street with increased levels of adrenaline in their system to detain in order to prevent potential violent outbursts? And will your car be scanned at stoplights for any trace amounts of suspicious substances? Would all this information be recorded anywhere?

Hidden Government Scanners Will Instantly Know Everything About You From 164 Feet Away

Above: A page from a Genia Photonics paper describing its ability to even penetrate through clothing.

There are a lot of questions with no answer yet, but it’s obvious that the potential level of personal invasion of this technology goes far beyond that of body scans, wiretaps, and GPS tracking.

The end of privacy coming soon

According to the undersecretary for science and technology of the Department of Homeland Security, this scanning technology will be ready within one to two years, which means you might start seeing them in airports as soon as 2013.

In other words, these portable, incredibly precise molecular-level scanning devices will be cascading lasers across your body as you walk from the bathroom to the soda machine at the airport and instantly reporting and storing a detailed breakdown of your person, in search of certain “molecular tags”.

Going well beyond eavesdropping, it seems quite possible that U.S. government plans on recording molecular data on travelers without their consent, or even knowledge that it’s possible—a scary thought. While the medical uses could revolutionize the way doctors diagnose illness, and any technology that could replace an aggressive pat-down is tempting, there’s a potential dark side to this implementation, and we need to shine some light on it before it’s implemented.

The author of this story is currently completing his PhD in renewable energy solutions, focusing on converting waste to energy in the urban environment. Even while most of this information is publicly available, he wanted to remain anonymous.

Image by oleandra/Shutterstock

Leave a comment

Filed under Man

Mandatory drug testing to start at Saint Mary’s High School – COS CO


POSTED: 12:55 PM MST Dec 13, 2012  
Drug Testing In High School

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. –Starting in the fall of 2013, school officials at Saint Mary’s High School said they will start mandatory and random drug testing for all students.

Jon Kraus, the president of St. Mary’s said there has been the occasional incident over drugs, but no major problems at the private Catholic school.

According to Kraus, the change in policy is motivated by the desire to keep the school a totally drug-free zone.

He said it gives students a way to combat peer pressure.

Kraus said, “Having a drug testing policy in high school allows the kids to say, ‘I can’t do that. I might be tested on Monday and I don’t want to get myself in trouble’.”

As a private school, Kraus said students agree to the code of conduct before every school year. These new changes are now part of school policy.

That means at the beginning of the 2013-2014 school year, every student will be required to undergo a hair drug test.

A few strands of hair will be cut from each student.

Those hair samples will be sent to Psychemedics Lab for testing. For more information about the test, click on this link: http://www.psychemedics.com

Then, Kraus said, random testing will start 90 days after the initial drug testing.

Each hair test costs about $40. There are 330 students at St. Mary’s which means the initial testing will cost about $13,200.

Students who test positive for drugs will not be reported to police unless it is required by law or police request results.

School officials said the most important part of the drug testing is that consequences will primarily be focused on helping students through therapeutic means.

However, students who test positive for drugs would be suspended for three days from school. They will also be suspended from co-curricular activities for 30 days.

In addition, administrators said students will be required to get help, especially if addiction is involved. Subsequent drug tests will also be required.

Officials said this is definitely the right choice for St. Mary’s High School.

According to administrators, parents and students should feel free to ask questions and voice concerns during the next few months.

Voluntary testing with parental permission is scheduled to start in March.

 

 

my opinion;

The slippery slope into tyranny is a long one, indoctrinating kids that unreasonable searches are okay and they have no rights under the US CONSTITUTION, specifically the Bill of Rights Article 4. This is an invasion of privacy and up to the parents to do to their kids if warranted, but not through the school system, private or otherwise!

Some think EVERYONE in America should be subjected to mandatory weekly drug testing. Those who fail to provide specimen or fail review will be sent to Guantanamo or some other rendition prison for a little r & r, or maybe we just send ’em to work rehab camps for corporate profits if they are ‘dirty’. Line up, zeee papers please! Be sure to receive your vaccine on the way out!

I understand that you don’t want your children harmed by smoking weed (they have this tendency to loose respect for all authority), yet you might turn right around and give them dangerous psychotropic drugs (anti-depressants) that that they pass out like candy these days to keep people compliant and numb; I know my brother was on them and it almost killed him (the correlation between psychiatric drugs and acts of violence including suicide and homicide has been well documented, look yourself). From what I’ve heard most kids are stealing their parents’ pain pills (aka hillbilly heroin) and od at the er. I wonder if they check for pharmaceuticals, high cholesterol too, and why not a DNA fingerprint for health and the ‘just in case you go missing’ BS!

I forgot since the PATRIOT and NDAA, we Americans have no defense against government or private/corporate intrusion on liberties; as speech, firearm ownership, or unlawful search of your body under the 4th (Bill of Rights); therefore we have no defense for the common liberty, freedom, and justice; only the wars and proxy of corporate/international interests, in far off lands and over the TV, in the name of ‘Freedom’ or keeping ‘terror’ at bay. Nor do we Americans have the presumption of innocence before search, unless warrant issued, since the war on freedom~uh humm I mean ‘war on terror’ makes us all suspect of something or another. We, the US people, should watch for all the signs of oligarchical totalitarianism, and how the ‘beast’ that has shown its head, aka tyranny, because an informed well armed citizenry is the only defense. some think I should take off the tinfoil but yall been warned (those who don’t know the big words look them up)

DNA fingerprinting had been done in Texas for years without parental consent (Andrea Beleno would rather be doing most anything else than dealing with how the State of Texas flat-out stole her son’s DNA fingerprint for a vast database of newborns at the hospital and against consent. For almost seven years, the state had been taking the blood of most newborns in Texas — and storing it without parental consent — for “possible use in medical research”), and under the radar.

I know, “If you aren’t doing anything wrong, you have nothing to worry about!”; yet I suspect something much more sinister than simple drug policy enforcement.

VERY IMPORTANT – This is teaching children a very bad message, THAT THEY ARE NOT TO BE TRUSTED

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Man

Why it is not smart to cooperate with ‘random’ police searches

But two recent cases drive home the point of why it doesn’t pay to cooperate with police: that of Army Lt. Augustine Kim and that of Diane Avera.

She was convicted after the trial judge allowed the prosecutor to make entirely unsubstantiated claims. These included that Avera had confessed to having used crystal meth for two years — her former employer, a physician, insisted there was never any indication she was a drug user — and that she had somehow “diluted” drug tests that showed she had no meth in her system.

Avera’s conviction is being appealed, and she is free on a $20,000 bond. But Kim accepted a deal that allowed him to plead guilty of one misdemeanor charge of possessing an unregistered gun with the understanding the charges would be dismissed and his guns and gun parts — worth $10,000 — would be returned if he stayed out of trouble for nine months. Now the Metropolitan Police are refusing to release Kim’s guns.

“The mistake he made was agreeing to a search of his vehicle,” Kim’s attorney Richard Gardiner told The Washington Times.

“If the police ask for consent to search, the answer is ‘no.’ If they ask, ‘why not?’ The answer is, ‘no.’”

“Am I being Arrested?” Then, “am I free to leave?” ALWAYS SIGN THE TICKET, IS IT NOT AN ADMISSION OF GUILT!

Read more…

Leave a comment

Filed under Man