Tag Archives: science

Temporary Tattoos Could Make Electronic Telepathy, Telekinesis Possible

via http://txchnologist.com by Charles Q. Choi

Temporary electronic tattoos could soon help people fly drones with only thought and talk seemingly telepathically without speech over smartphones, researchers say.

Commanding machines using the brain is no longer the stuff of science fiction. In recent years, brain implants have enabled people to control robotics using only their minds, raising the prospect that one day patients could overcome disabilities using bionic limbs or mechanical exoskeletons.

But brain implants are invasive technologies, probably of use only to people in medical need of them. Instead, electrical engineer Todd Coleman at the University of California at San Diego is devising noninvasive means of controlling machines via the mind, techniques virtually everyone might be able to use.

His team is developing wireless flexible electronics one can apply on the forehead just like temporary tattoos to read brain activity.

“We want something we can use in the coffee shop to have fun,” Coleman says.

The devices are less than 100 microns thick, the average diameter of a human hair. They consist of circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. They are barely visible when placed on skin, making them easy to conceal from others.

The devices can detect electrical signals linked with brain waves, and incorporate solar cells for power and antennas that allow them to communicate wirelessly or receive energy. Other elements can be added as well, like thermal sensors to monitor skin temperature and light detectors to analyze blood oxygen levels.

Using the electronic tattoos, Coleman and his colleagues have found they can detect brain signals reflective of mental states, such as recognition of familiar images. One application they are now pursuing is monitoring premature babies to detect the onset of seizures that can lead to epilepsy or brain development problems. The devices are now being commercialized for use as consumer, digital health, medical device, and industrial and defense products by startup MC10 in Cambridge, Mass.

image

Electronic telekinesis? Digital telepathy?

In past studies, Coleman’s team found that volunteers could use caps studded with electrodes to remotely control airplanes and flew an unmanned aerial vehicle over cornfields in Illinois. Although the electronic tattoos currently cannot be used to pilot planes, “we’re actively working on that,” Coleman says.

These devices can also be put on other parts of the body, such as the throat. When people think about talking, their throat muscles move even if they do not speak, a phenomenon known as subvocalization. Electronic tattoos placed on the throat could therefore behave as subvocal microphones through which people could communicate silently and wirelessly.

“We’ve demonstrated our sensors can pick up the electrical signals of muscle movements in the throat so that people can communicate just with thought,” Coleman says. Electronic tattoos placed over the throat could also pick up signals that would help smartphones with speech recognition, he added.

Invasive brain implants remain better at reading brain activity, Coleman notes.

But neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis at Duke University Medical Center says there is a need for noninvasive technologies such as these for the brain. “People will want to navigate environments just by thinking, or play games just by thinking,” says Nicolelis, who did not take part in this research.

Coleman detailed his group’s most recent findings in Boston on Feb. 17 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Top Image: Image of a piece of electronics with physical properties, i.e. stiffness, bending rigidity, thickness and mass density, matched to the epidermis. Such ‘epidermal’ electronic systems seamlessly integrate and conform to the surface of the skin in a way that is mechanically invisible to the user. The devices have the potential to provide a range of healthcare and non-healthcare related functions. Image courtesy John A. Rogers.

Middle Image: The Neural Interaction Lab led by UC San Diego bioengineering professor Todd Coleman is working with Mary J. Harbert, MD, director of neonatal neurology UCSD and Rady Children’s Hospital, to study the use of stamp-sized wearable patches of tiny circuits, sensors, and wireless transmitters to replace bulky wires currently used to monitor newborns in the neonatal ICU. The greatest advance in the neonatal ICU for premature babies has been stabilizing the heart and lung. But nowadays, experts are increasingly focusing on brain injury: under-development of the cerebral vasculature, hemorrhage, and seizures commonly occur in premies. If left unchecked, they can lead to epilepsy or cognitive development problems. Image courtesy Todd Coleman/UCSD.

Bottom Image: The Neural Interaction Lab led by UC San Diego bioengineering professor Todd Coleman is working with Ricardo Gil da Costa, PhD, at the Salk Institute to examine the use of wearable flexible electronics on the forehead to monitor congnitive impairment with systems that are minimally obtrusive. These patches of sensors monitor electrical rhythms of the brain and can wirelessly transmit information optically (via LEDs) or electromagnetically (via flexible antennas) to provide quantitative measures of attentional modulation that co-vary with the progression of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, depression, and schizophrenia. These minimally obtrusive wearable electronics provide promise for future clinical brain monitoring applications for hospitals and laboratories, outpatient clinics or even at home. Image courtesy Todd Coleman/UCSD.


Charles Q. Choi
 has written for Scientific American, The New York Times, Wired, Science and Nature, among others. In his spare time, he has traveled to all seven continents, including scaling the side of an iceberg in Antarctica, investigating mummies from Siberia, snorkeling in the Galapagos, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, camping in the Outback, avoiding thieves near Shaolin Temple and hunting for mammoth DNA in Yukon.

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Giant Coronal Mass Ejection unleashed onto Earth September 3rd, 2012

Two days after the CME impact of Sept. 3rd 2012, Earth’s polar magnetic field is still stormy and unsettled. Look out!!!

According to Tami Urbanek via NaturalNews.com  According to some researchers, strong solar activity can also disrupt the Earth’s tectonic plates and trigger earthquakes. Incidentally, there was a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) released on February 15th, and it hit the Earth on February 17th. Another CME was released on March 7th, 2011. Both of these CMEs were released just prior to the New Zealand and Japan earthquakes. Some CMEs released may not produce an effect as significant as an earthquake; however, they can still affect each person’s EEF. All people carry their individual EEF. The strength can vary among different people, so as a result, each person will be affected a little differently.
Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/032045_solar_flares_Earth.html

 

via http://www.space.com ‘Northern Lights Blaze Up After Big Sun Storm’ Mike Wall, SPACE.com Senior Writer

Date: 04 September 2012 Time: 06:10 PM ET
Supercharged Northern Lights Dance Over Finland

 
The northern lights, supercharged by a recent solar storm, dance above Naimakka, Finland, in this shot snapped on Sept. 4, 2012, by Ole Salomonsen.
CREDIT: Ole Salomonsen (http://www.facebook.com/arcticlightphoto

The northern lights erupted in a stunning display Monday night (Sept. 3) after a recent solar storm, amazing skywatchers around the world.

On Friday (Aug. 31), the sun unleashed a coronal mass ejection(CME), sending a huge cloud of charged particles streaking into space at more than 3.2 million mph (5.1 million kph), NASA researchers said. The CME delivered a glancing blow to Earth’s magnetosphere, putting on quite a show for stargazers at high latitudes.

Photographer Ole Salomonsen captured the supercharged northern lights — also known as the aurora borealis — from a forest near Naimakka, Finland. He drove about 120 miles (200 kilometers) to get there, as the weather wasn’t cooperating in Tromso, Norway, where he lives and works.

 

Northern lights above Finland, super-charged by a solar storm.

Photographer Ole Salomonsen captured this stunning shot of the northern lights above Namaikka, Finland, on Sept. 4, 2012.

But the view was worth the international trip, Salomonsen said.

“There I was standing all alone deep into the Finnish forest, just in awe of this display of light that happened above my head,” he wrote in a Facebook post.

Even a bright moon couldn’t spoil the show, Salomonsen added.

“A large moon is not normally optimal for watching auroras, especially not when it’s not completely dark yet up here,” he told SPACE.com via email. “But the moon actually contributed to absolutely magic photographic conditions, with the mist/fog over the lakes.”

Sun unleashes massive coronal mass ejection on Aug. 31, 2012.

 
NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft captured this massive coronal mass ejection (CME) erupting from the sun on Aug. 31, 2012.
CREDIT: NASA/SDO/AIA/GSFC

Big CMEs that hit Earth squarely can wreak havoc, spawning powerful geomagnetic storms with the potential to disrupt GPS signals, radio communications and power grids. But the storms resulting from Friday’s CME — which occurred after an enormous filament erupted from the sun’s surface — were minor and apparently had little impact aside from the ramped-up auroras.

The northern and southern lights result when charged particles from the sun collide with molecules high in Earth’s atmosphere, generating a glow.

The auroras are usually restricted to high latitutes because Earth’s magnetic field lines tend to funnel these particles over the planet’s poles. Solar storms can increase both the intensity and reach of auroral displays, bringing them into view for more skywatchers around the world.

After remaining relatively quiet from 2005 through 2010, the sun began waking up last year. It has fired off numerous strong flares and CMEs over the last two years, and researchers predict more such activity in the near future.

Solar activity waxes and wanes on an 11-year cycle. Scientists think the current one, known as Solar Cycle 24, will peak sometime in 2013.

 

 

 

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Magnetic Portals Found in Earth’s Atmosphere

more sun storms: higher earth temps

sunportalWORLD NEWS TOMORROW – Science-fiction writers have toyed with the concept of a portal for many years, and scientists have been trying to discover such a structure in real life. A new study backed by NASA has revealed the existence of a so-called magnetic portal, connecting the atmospheres of the Earth and the Sun.

Usually, a portal is defined as an opening through spacetime that enables a traveler to move over great distances, or over time, instantly. In other words, it represents a shortcut, or maybe a guiding pathway to a particular destination.

Using funds provided by the American space agency, experts at the University of Iowa have recently been able to discover electron diffusion regions (X-points), where the magnetic field of Earth connects directly to the magnetic field of the Sun.

This link creates an uninterrupted path leading from our own planet to the Sun’s atmosphere,” more than 93 million miles (157 million kilometers) away,” says UI plasma physicist Jack Scudder.

The observations that led to this conclusion were carried out using the Cluster constellation – which is operated by the European Space Agency (ESA) – and the NASA Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission.

The satellites indicate that the magnetic portals open and close several times per day, and that they are located around only a few tens of thousands of kilometers away from Earth. They prefer to appear at locations where the geomagnetic field meets incoming solar winds.

These portals can be either short-lived, or can last for a longer time, allowing highly energetic particles to flow right through. These particles can heat the planet’s upper atmosphere, create geomagnetic storms, and spawn very bright auroras.

NASA plans to study these magnetic portals in more detail, once it launches the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS), in 2014. The constellation will feature four identical satellites.

All the vehicles will study magnetic reconnection, a process that occurs high above the planet, and which can provide telltale signs regarding the formation of magnetic portals. Each of the MMS spacecraft will have the ability to detect these clues, and then alert the others of the impending event.

MORE HERE…  World News

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Transit of Venus : to cross the face of the sun on Tuesday June 5, 2012

Cooperation

Bird Flies During Transit Of Venus
June 8, 2004 file photo shows the transit of Venus, which occurs when the planet Venus passes between the Earth and the Sun, is pictured in Hong Kong. Venus will cross the face of the sun on Tuesday June 5, 2012, a sight that will be visible from parts of Earth. This is the last transit for more than 100 years. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu,File)

Click for more on Quetzalcoatl and the Oneness Celebration

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Seismic Monitor

IRIS Realtime Seismic Monitor

Awesome!

Seismic Monitor allows you to monitor global earthquakes in near real-time, visit seismic stations around the world, and search the web for earthquake or region-related information. You can also view seismograms and make dataset requests via its WILBER interface.

The date and time of the map (in Universal Time) are located in the lower right hand corner.

Earthquakes are shown as colored circles, where the size of the circle tells you the magnitude of the quake, using the legend at the top left of the map. Only earthquakes of magnitude 4.0 or greater are displayed. (Locations and magnitudes are provided to IRIS by the USGS. Earthquakes greater than magnitude 4.0 may be missing from the USGS catalog in some parts of the wor ld because local networks have not yet reported them to the USGS. In such cases please check with your local or national network.)
Circle Color
Age of Earthquake
Red
the last 24 hours    <– animates briefly when page is loaded
Orange
from 24 to 48 hours
Yellow
from 3 days to 2 weeks
Purple
from 2 weeks up to 5 years
The distribution of earthquakes over the past 5 years is represented by the purple dots and demonstrates how earthquakes define the boundaries of tectonic plates, as well as the relationship between topography and earthquakes.
The Earth’s shadow shows the line between day and night as well as the progression of the seasons.

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Say goodbye to your mouse and keyboard.

Via: Leap:

Leap represents an entirely new way to interact with your computers. It’s more accurate than a mouse, as reliable as a keyboard and more sensitive than a touchscreen.  For the first time, you can control a computer in three dimensions with your natural hand and finger movements.

This isn’t a game system that roughly maps your hand movements.  The Leap technology is 200 times more accurate than anything else on the market — at any price point. Just about the size of a flash drive, the Leap can distinguish your individual fingers and track your movements down to a 1/100th of a millimeter.

More here…

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