Tag Archives: Solar Storm

X-Class solar flare (CME) coming?

preface: According to some researchers, strong solar activity can also disrupt the Earth’s tectonic plates and trigger earthquakes. Incidentally, there was a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) released on February 15th, and it hit the Earth on February 17th. Another CME was released on March 7th, 2011. Both of these CMEs were released just prior to the New Zealand and Japan earthquakes. Some CMEs released may not produce an effect as significant as an earthquake; however, they can still affect each person’s biorhythms and mood as well as overall heart health. All people carry their individual EEF. The strength can vary among different people, so as a result, each person will be affected a little differently.
Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/032045_solar_flares_Earth.html
Also, why so many utility pole fires; could the solar activity be related?
NASA’s SDO Observes Fast-Growing Sunspot
02.20.13

Active Region 1678 has grown quickly over a 2 day period, Feb. 19-20, 2013.

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The bottom two black spots on the sun, known as sunspots, appeared quickly over the course of Feb. 19-20, 2013. These two sunspots are part of the same system and are over six Earths across. This image combines images from two instruments on NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), which takes pictures in visible light that show sunspots and the Advanced Imaging Assembly (AIA), which took an image in the 304 Angstrom wavelength showing the lower atmosphere of the sun, which is colorized in red. Credit: NASA/SDO/AIA/HMI/Goddard Space Flight Center

As magnetic fields on the sun rearrange and realign, dark spots known as sunspots can appear on its surface. Over the course of Feb. 19-20, 2013, scientists watched a giant sunspot form in under 48 hours. It has grown to over six Earth diameters across but its full extent is hard to judge since the spot lies on a sphere not a flat disk.

The spot quickly evolved into what’s called a delta region, in which the lighter areas around the sunspot, the penumbra, exhibit magnetic fields that point in the opposite direction of those fields in the center, dark area. This is a fairly unstable configuration that scientists know can lead to eruptions of radiation on the sun called solar flares.

Karen C. Fox
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

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A solar ‘superstorm’ is coming and we’ll only get 30-minute warning

via http://www.independent.co.uk/

A solar “superstorm” could knock out Earth’s communications satellites, cause dangerous power surges in the national grid and disrupt crucial navigation aids and aircraft avionics, a major report has found.

It is inevitable that an extreme solar storm – caused by the Sun ejecting billions of tonnes of highly-energetic matter travelling at a million miles an hour – will hit the Earth at some time in the near future, but it is impossible to predict more than about 30 minutes before it actually happens, a team of engineers has warned.

Solar superstorms are estimated to occur once every 100 or 200 years, with the last one hitting the Earth in 1859.

Although none has occurred in the space age, we are far more vulnerable now than a century ago because of the ubiquity of modern electronics, they said.

“The general consensus is that a solar superstorm is inevitable, a matter not of ‘if’ but ‘when?’,” says a report into extreme space weather by a group of experts at the Royal Academy of Engineering in London.

In the past half century, there have been a number of “near misses” when an explosive “coronal mass ejection” of energetic matter from the Sun has been flung into space, narrowly bypassing the Earth.

In 1989 a relatively minor solar storm knocked out several key electrical transformers in the Canadian national grid, causing major power blackouts.

Similar solar storms significantly increased atmospheric radiation levels in 1956, 1972, 1989 and 2003, the experts found.

Professor Paul Cannon, who chaired the academy’s working group on solar storms, said that the Government should set up a space weather board to oversee measures aimed at minimising the impact of solar storms.

“A solar superstorm will be a challenge but not cataclysmic. The two challenges for government are the wide spectrum of technologies affected today and the emergence of unexpected vulnerabilities as technology evolves,” he said.

“Our message is, ‘Don’t panic, but do prepare’. A solar superstorm will happen one day and we need to be ready for it.

“Many steps have already been taken to minimise the impact of solar storms on current technology… We anticipate that the UK can further minimise the impact,” he added.

Minor solar storms hit the Earth on a regular basis, but these are far less powerful than the 1859 event named after the British astronomer Richard Carrington, which was the last true solar superstorm.

A similar event today would put severe strain the electricity grid, where transformers are particular vulnerable to power surges, as well as degrading the performance of satellites, GPS navigation, aviation and possibly the mobile phone network, particularly the new 4G network, which relies on GPS satellites for timing information.

“Satellites are certainly in the front line of a superstorm. They are part of our infrastructure and we have concerns about their survival in a solar superstorm,” said Keith Ryden, a space engineer at Surrey University.

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Giant Coronal Mass Ejection unleashed onto Earth September 3rd, 2012

Two days after the CME impact of Sept. 3rd 2012, Earth’s polar magnetic field is still stormy and unsettled. Look out!!!

According to Tami Urbanek via NaturalNews.com  According to some researchers, strong solar activity can also disrupt the Earth’s tectonic plates and trigger earthquakes. Incidentally, there was a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) released on February 15th, and it hit the Earth on February 17th. Another CME was released on March 7th, 2011. Both of these CMEs were released just prior to the New Zealand and Japan earthquakes. Some CMEs released may not produce an effect as significant as an earthquake; however, they can still affect each person’s EEF. All people carry their individual EEF. The strength can vary among different people, so as a result, each person will be affected a little differently.
Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/032045_solar_flares_Earth.html

 

via http://www.space.com ‘Northern Lights Blaze Up After Big Sun Storm’ Mike Wall, SPACE.com Senior Writer

Date: 04 September 2012 Time: 06:10 PM ET
Supercharged Northern Lights Dance Over Finland

 
The northern lights, supercharged by a recent solar storm, dance above Naimakka, Finland, in this shot snapped on Sept. 4, 2012, by Ole Salomonsen.
CREDIT: Ole Salomonsen (http://www.facebook.com/arcticlightphoto

The northern lights erupted in a stunning display Monday night (Sept. 3) after a recent solar storm, amazing skywatchers around the world.

On Friday (Aug. 31), the sun unleashed a coronal mass ejection(CME), sending a huge cloud of charged particles streaking into space at more than 3.2 million mph (5.1 million kph), NASA researchers said. The CME delivered a glancing blow to Earth’s magnetosphere, putting on quite a show for stargazers at high latitudes.

Photographer Ole Salomonsen captured the supercharged northern lights — also known as the aurora borealis — from a forest near Naimakka, Finland. He drove about 120 miles (200 kilometers) to get there, as the weather wasn’t cooperating in Tromso, Norway, where he lives and works.

 

Northern lights above Finland, super-charged by a solar storm.

Photographer Ole Salomonsen captured this stunning shot of the northern lights above Namaikka, Finland, on Sept. 4, 2012.

But the view was worth the international trip, Salomonsen said.

“There I was standing all alone deep into the Finnish forest, just in awe of this display of light that happened above my head,” he wrote in a Facebook post.

Even a bright moon couldn’t spoil the show, Salomonsen added.

“A large moon is not normally optimal for watching auroras, especially not when it’s not completely dark yet up here,” he told SPACE.com via email. “But the moon actually contributed to absolutely magic photographic conditions, with the mist/fog over the lakes.”

Sun unleashes massive coronal mass ejection on Aug. 31, 2012.

 
NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft captured this massive coronal mass ejection (CME) erupting from the sun on Aug. 31, 2012.
CREDIT: NASA/SDO/AIA/GSFC

Big CMEs that hit Earth squarely can wreak havoc, spawning powerful geomagnetic storms with the potential to disrupt GPS signals, radio communications and power grids. But the storms resulting from Friday’s CME — which occurred after an enormous filament erupted from the sun’s surface — were minor and apparently had little impact aside from the ramped-up auroras.

The northern and southern lights result when charged particles from the sun collide with molecules high in Earth’s atmosphere, generating a glow.

The auroras are usually restricted to high latitutes because Earth’s magnetic field lines tend to funnel these particles over the planet’s poles. Solar storms can increase both the intensity and reach of auroral displays, bringing them into view for more skywatchers around the world.

After remaining relatively quiet from 2005 through 2010, the sun began waking up last year. It has fired off numerous strong flares and CMEs over the last two years, and researchers predict more such activity in the near future.

Solar activity waxes and wanes on an 11-year cycle. Scientists think the current one, known as Solar Cycle 24, will peak sometime in 2013.

 

 

 

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